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"The goal of a CME AWAY® conference by Sea Courses is to provide the very best opportunity for health care professionals to not only LEARN but to CONNECT with peers in a stimulating yet RELAXING environment."

15-Night Intensive Norway CME AWAY® Cruise

Onboard the Silver Whisper

TBA

Sailing July 27th, 2022 - August 11th, 2022

Trip Characteristics

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Faculty & CME Details

TBA

TBA

Specialty:

TBA

About The Speaker

Speaker to be announced

This course is designed for family physicians, specialists, and allied health care professionals. The aim is to provide evidence-based material, as well as practical and relevant clinical pearls that will be easy to implement into one’s own medical practice. Conference attendees will be invited to complete a pre-course Needs Assessment to assist the faculty with the development of their presentations.

Conference Tuition Price
FP $1345
Specialist $1345
Resident, Retired, NP, RN, PA, Other $1145
Conference Tuition Book Before October 27th, 2021 Book After October 27th, 2021
FP $1195 $1345
Specialist $1195 $1345
Resident, Retired, NP, RN, PA, Other $995 $1145

Venue Information

Starting in London’s gothic splendour, enjoy a day at sea to charge your batteries. Sail north to Norway and her fabled fjords. Take a trip on the Flam railway, before finding your great outdoors amid the country’s superlative scenery. But perhaps it is cruising along the North Cape that is the jewel in the crown of this trip. Situated at the very north tip of Norway and inside the Arctic Circle, there is something very special about being (almost) at the top of the world.

EXCLUSIVE GROUP OFFER – $250 ONBOARD CREDIT PER SUITE!

Additional Noteworthy Features

Silversea’s small luxury ships are designed for those who delight in the thrill of discovery while indulging mind and body in the most lavish surroundings imaginable. All accommodations are spacious, ocean-view suites that include butler service, and most include private verandas. Our intimate, ultra-luxury ships can sail up narrow waterways into the heart of a city, or tie up right at the pier while others must anchor off shore. And for those who yearn to explore the new and unknown, Silversea Expeditions can transport you to the further most boundaries of the planet. Enjoy the ease, convenience and value of an all-inclusive cruise fare that includes almost all of your discretionary onboard expenses.

Dining

When dining aboard Silversea ships, gastronomic excellence is a given, thanks to our partnership with the prestigious Grands Chefs Relais & Châteaux. Renowned for culinary excellence and innovative spirit, Silversea’s luxury cruises offer a choice of open-seating dining options throughout the fleet, as well as several specialty venues. No matter where you dine, there will be great diversity and freshness in your selections. Dine amid sparkling crystal, silver and sweeping ocean views in our main dining room. Join friends or find a table for two, and enjoy Continental or regional specialties impeccably presented and graciously served. The Restaurant is an open-seating dining room, which means there are no assigned times, no assigned tables. You are free to arrive at your leisure and dine with whomever you choose. For a more casual dining experience, enjoy a meal at the Grill for soft breezes and ocean views, especially as the sun goes down. Cruise guests can gather at the outdoor bar and talk about the day’s events. Complimentary room service is also available for all guests.

Enriching Experiences

Imagine exploring the history and culture of captivating destinations before you ever step foot off your ship. Our knowledgeable team of onboard Destination Consultants is delighted to share their regional expertise to Silversea guests, with informal discussions throughout your voyage and commentaries from the bridge. Elevating your cruise travel adventure to more stimulating heights. Gain an insider’s perspective on your voyage’s destinations. From where to shop, to top-rated eateries, and the area’s must-see sights. Ensuring you will journey ashore like a true native. While on your luxury cruise, embark on a personal journey of wellness to complement your global adventures. Work out in the well-equipped Fitness Centre, take a class in circuit training or Pilates in the aerobics room, and let the sauna and steam rooms work their magic to soothe every muscle. Silversea offers seminars ranging from aromatherapy and nutrition to how to burn fat. A holistic approach to wellness fully integrates exercise, fitness and spa therapies with health lectures and nutritious dining to help you maintain a healthy lifestyle, even while away from home.

Inclusive Amenities for All Guests

  • Select wines, premium spirits, specialty coffees and soft drinks
  • Butler service for all suites
  • Complimentary room service
  • Gratuities
  • Open-seating dining options
  • Complimentary WIFI

Itinerary & Schedule

Date Port / Location Arrival Time Departure Time Notes / CME Details
July 27th London (Greenwich), England
July 28th At Sea 1:00 AM 8:00 AM—12:30 PM; 1:30 PM—3:30 PM
July 29th Newcastle, England 7:00 AM 1:30 PM
July 30th Stavanger, Norway 1:00 PM 10:00 PM 8:00 AM—12:00 PM
July 31st Bergen, Norway 8:00 AM 7:00 PM
August 1st Flåm, Norway 8:00 AM 6:00 PM
August 2nd Nordfjordeid, Norway 9:00 AM 6:00 PM
August 3rd Geiranger, Norway | Hellesylt, Norway 7:00 AM | 4:00 PM 2:00 PM | 5:30 PM
August 4th Molde (Romsdal), Norway 8:00 AM 7:00 PM
August 5th At Sea 8:00 AM—12:00 PM; 1:00 PM—3:15 PM
August 6th Leknes (Vestvågøy), Norway 8:00 AM 10:00 PM
August 7th Narvik, Norway 7:00 AM 1:00 PM
August 8th Honningsvag (North Cape), Norway 8:00 AM 6:00 PM
August 9th Alta, Norway 8:00 AM 6:00 PM
August 10th Tromsø, Norway 7:00 AM
August 11th Oslo, Norway

Detailed Port Descriptions

London (Greenwich), England

Set your watches for Greenwich, a Royal borough of London, that is literally located at the centre of the world - dissected as it is by the Meridian Line. The line neatly splits the globe in half and marks zero degrees on the map. Enjoy a stroll past the glittering lake and sniffing deer of leafy Greenwich Park, or settle for a quiet drink in a charming riverside pub as you enjoy London's quieter side, and the spiritual home of science and seafaring history. Britain has extraordinary heritage on the waves, and you can learn more of the era when Britannia ruled the waves at the National Maritime Museum. Another piece of maritime history has been raised out of the water, and proudly displayed here for all to enjoy in Greenwich. The Cutty Sark was one of the fastest clipper ships ever built, and you can climb aboard to steer the wheel of this spectacular, living piece of maritime history, which is now housed on the banks of the Thames. The celebrated Royal Observatory is a revered font of knowledge, which has been observing, studying and measuring the sea and stars since 1675. Divided by the Meridian Line, you can step between continents, as you explore this global centre of learning and science, which is the home of Greenwich Mean Time. The unmistakable white half-moon of the O2 Arena sits snuggly in a meander of the Thames River. Built to mark the arrival of the Millennium, the dome is now used as London and the UK’s biggest and busiest concert venue – hosting major entertainment acts on a nightly basis.

Newcastle, England

A delightful blend of ancient and modern, Newcastle is one of the liveliest cities in northern England. Originally built in the 11th century, the Castle Keep was the “new castle” for which the city is named. Stroll along the River Tyne and marvel at the different bridges that have transformed the face of the city. Modern art is the main attraction at the BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, while the history of Newcastle unfolds at the Great North Museum.

Stavanger, Norway

With a pristine historic core, and epic scenery all around, Norway’s energy capital is a dynamic powerhouse of the south. The city's growth was fuelled by North Sea oil exploits and industry – but this being Norway, you can prepare to visit a perhaps surprisingly charming place, surrounded by spectacular landscapes of cutting fjords, soaring mountains and sandy beaches. With a high international population and regular youthful influxes to its university - Norway’s third-biggest city is a diverse and energetic highlight of this dramatic country. Any preconceptions of a lifeless, industrial city are instantly allayed by the colourful Øvre Holmegate street. A gorgeous palette of candy-coloured wooden shops and cafes shine brightly along this picturesque row - and you can soak in the colours and the quaint charm of a stroll along the waterfront too. Museums explore Stavanger’s industries - from oil to sardine canning - and the Viking past of one of Norway's oldest cities. The flower-tangled, 173 white wooden houses of Gamle Stavanger are a delightful slice of preserved old Norway, and gas lamps hang over uneven cobbled streets here. Norway’s oldest church, Domkirken Cathedral, looms up impressively, having stood since the 12th century. Stretching from the city itself, Lysefjord is one of Norway’s most striking and picturesque fjords - drenched in Viking history and mythology. Cruise the waters, or hike to the majestic Preikestolen viewpoint, where you can look out over an impossibly vast view, from a height of 604 metres. One of Norway’s most iconic and most-visited natural sites, your heart will be in your mouth as you get as close as you dare to the stunning vertical drop down to Lysefjord. It’s a long, tough hike, so why not see it from another perspective, by soaring into the skies on an unforgettable helicopter tour.

Bergen, Norway

The crooked, pastel-coloured warehouses of Bergen’s World Heritage waterfront lean together charmingly, welcoming visitors to this city at the heart of Norway’s most extraordinary cinematic landscapes. It may be the country’s second largest city, but the villagey feel here always provides a warm welcome - even when the weather is living up to its famously damp reputation. Bergen’s colourful waterfront, Bryggen, is a ramshackle line-up of incredible Hanseatic warehouses, built following the devastating fire of 1702, which ransacked the city. These iconic warehouses have stood proudly ever since, with Bergen growing and expanding around the colourful facades. Behind them, a labyrinth of narrow alleyways and wooden decking waits, alive with artisan craft shops and bustling galleries. Fløyen mountain watches over the city, and you can take a short but steep hike up to the panoramic viewpoints, or jump on the funicular, which trundles visitors up and down the incline. At the top, spectacular views of Bergen jutting out into the dark seas below unfold before your eyes. Wait until evening to see the sunset painting glorious golden light across the city and waves, and Bergen’s lights flickering into life. Nærøyfjorden, a deeply etched fjord nearby, is perhaps Norway’s most photographed and iconic piece of scenery. A cruise through the base of this spectacular narrow fjord, parting the glass-smooth inky waters, is an utterly humbling experience, as the claustrophobically-close slopes rise imposingly over you. Sognefjord also stretches out nearby, and is Norway’s longest fjord, adorned with plunging waterfalls and vibrant farms during summer.

Flåm, Norway

If we haven’t said it already, Norway’s luxury is its sheer natural beauty. And at the very top of the pile is the all-inclusive Flam, a destination that is home to Glacial waterways lined by evergreen forests amidst jagged mountains and sheer cliff walls. Situated inland, on the arm of the 204-kilometre Sognefjord, the village has just 400 inhabitants. Its little size does not belie its gigantic heart, and Flam’s expansive loveliness knows no bounds. In fact, UNESCO has dedicated the Sognefjord as a World Heritage Site for its exquisite natural beauty. There are many ways to imbibe in the beauty of this destination. Some of the more peaceful among you will enjoy just drinking it all in from the veranda or deck of your ship, while adrenaline bunnies will most probably want to jump in a Zodiac and gain first-hand experience that way. But beware! Travelling the shores of one of the deepest fjords may be exciting but it is also fast, wet and bumpy! Most visitors will not want to miss out on a one-hour train journey that has been describes by more than one source as being “the world’s most beautiful”. The Flam railway is iconic and will have you holding your breath as your travel through steep, winding roads, around massive mountains, and past gushing rivers and waterfalls. Scary? A little. Picturesque? No question. Worth it? Most definitely.

Nordfjordeid, Norway

The port of Nordfjordeid is a sprawling urban area that borders the largest glaciers on the European mainland. The biggest of those glaciers, Briksdalen, is a draw for many international travelers each year. As the administrative center for the municipality of Eid, Nordfjordeid is a premiere stop for modern culture. It is home to a bustling, professional opera company and the Sophus Lie Conference Center for Mathematics. The outskirts of town, to either the north or south, offers a variety of hiking trails challenging for beginning and seasoned hikers alike. Nordfjordeid was the original site where locals and professionals helped reconstruct the Myklebust, the largest Viking ship ever found, and now it resides in the nearby Sagastad center.

Geiranger, Norway

Witness Norway at its awe-inspiring best, while exploring one of the world's most beautiful fjords. Geiranger nestles at the end of the majestic Geiranger fjord, itself a branch of the Storfjorden, the Great Fjord. While only 300 hardy souls live in the village when winter is biting, Geiranger's population swells exponentially in the summertime, when the village becomes one of Norway's most visited locations - providing a welcoming base for visitors coming to revel in the fantasy fjord's glory. Sweeping horseshoe bends unveil the full majesty of Geiranger fjord, one of two Norwegian fjords singled out for UNESCO World Heritage Site status. Soak it all in, as you sail the ten-mile stretch of glorious scenery, decorated with cascading flows of water. The Seven Sisters is perhaps the most celebrated - sprawling down 250 metres like a flowing head of silvery hair. Look out across from these seven flows to the bottle-shaped waterfall known as The Suitor - legend says he tries eternally, to win the affections of the Seven Sisters opposite. Sail onwards, and you can feel the fresh spray on your face, up close and personal to another spectacular flow - Bridal Veil Waterfall. Geiranger's fjord's banks are decorated with abandoned farms, including Knivsflå, and Skageflå. Or you can experience life on a working cheese farm at Herdalssetra. Winding hairpin mountain roads offer some of Europe's highest fjord views, while the Dalsnibba mountain - which stands close to the fjord - offers spine-tingling views from an epic 1,500-metre high pedestal. Get as close to the edge as you dare, and let this one-of-a-kind landscape of snow-capped mountain peaks and wide fjords utterly overwhelm you.

Hellesylt, Norway

Sail along veiny fjords, deep into the heart of Norway’s spine-tingling scenery. Hellesylt is a quiet fishing town, practically swallowed whole by the blockbuster landscapes around it. A wide, sprawling waterfall roars through the village, adding thundering drama to the quiet cluster of farmhouses, which huddle among emerald fields and a theatrical landscape. Embark on epic hikes, kayak adventures, or simply sit back to open your eyes wide and soak it all in with a coffee. Located deep within Norway’s sinewy network of world-renowned fjords, which lace in from the west coast, Hellesylt waits for you at the terminus of Sunnylvsfjorden. Pretty white churches cling precariously to the dropping banks of the fjord, and while Sunnylvsfjorden is gorgeous in its own right - it feels practically restrained in comparison to the showpiece majesty of nearby Geirangerfjord - which branches off close to the town. Quintessential Norway - and utterly humbling - it’s perhaps the most beautiful stretch of fjord anywhere in the world. Strewn with waterfall veils, including the celebrated Seven Sisters Fall - which strings rainbows across its clutch of narrow flows - sailing in the base of this steep theatre of natural splendour is a true privilege. However, you choose to explore the landscape of curving lush green scenery, crumpled peaks dusted with snow, and gushing waterfalls, your time in this epicentre of Norwegian splendour will be a true highlight of your trip.

Molde (Romsdal), Norway

A collection of 222 snow-coated mountain peaks welcome you to Molde’s glorious coastal setting. The protective mountain range keeps the climate in check, sparing the city from the harsh brunt of the cold weather, and lending the place a more cosmopolitan feel than you might expect from this northerly latitude. The city has rebuilt and renewed, having bounced back from the brink of destruction - when it was the target of firebombs, during a brief tenure as Norway's defacto capital. Now, you can explore a pretty place of impressive history, which has been swinging to the pulse of one of Europe’s biggest jazz festivals for over half a century. The cathedral waits in the town centre, with a skeletal bell tower watching out over the surrounding waters. Molde is known as the Town of Roses, and the scent of colourful blooms carries on breezes down from the Town Hall’s roof-top gardens. See some traditional life in the open-air Romsdal Museum, which has gathered a collection of farm buildings and traditional timber houses to showcase the area's heritage. Learn of traditional bread baking, weaving and Norwegian Folk Dancing during your visit. Rise 400 metres to the Varden viewpoint, for a spectacular panorama of the Romsdal Alps reflecting in Romsdalsfjord's waters. Almost swallowed up by the immense scenery nearby - including the sheer vertical Troll Wall and crashing waterfalls - Molde’s setting posed some severe engineering quandaries. Plucky Norwegian engineers rose to the challenge, devising the incredible Atlantic Road. An undulating ride of soaring elevations and eight humped bridges, the road links islands and forms one of the world’s most spectacular drives. Hold on tight as you skirt crashing waves, and duck and dive through the hair-raising scenery.

Leknes (Vestvågøy), Norway

Blessed with some of the most spectacular scenery in Norway (and goodness only know that this is land blessed with rolling hills, soaring peaks, valleys, tranquil fjords and white sandy beaches, so the competition is high!), Leknes is what Norway is meant to be. Pretty red houses lay dotted on the green covered hills, and the midnight sun is rises above the horizon from 26th May to 17th July, (while in winter the sun does not rise from 9th December to 4th January). Part of the stunning Lofoten islands, this pretty port offers much in the way of recreation, although understandably most of this is outdoor based. Take a boat ride around the archipelago, try your hand at some deep sea fishing, or simply stroll thought the city centre, perhaps rent a bicycle and discover the hinterland at your own pace. Bikes can be easily rented and note that hybrid and electric bikes are a great option for those who might be a bit out of practice with their pedal power. Gastronomes with a sweet tooth will be rewarded with one simple pleasure: a fresh-from-the-oven skillingsbolle – or big, fluffy cinnamon rolls, fit for indulging in if all the fresh air has made you hungry! Look out for the quirky coffee shops, settle down for some Norwegian kos, say takk for maten and enjoy!

Narvik, Norway

Slap bang in the middle of Norway’s fjords, islands and northern wonders, Narvik, is an ideal base from which to explore this magical region. A city since 1902, it sits on the coast of Ofotfjorden inside the Arctic circle. This northerly latitude means Narvik bathes in the midnight sun during summer's months and is witness to the dazzling displays of the northern lights, which enchant as they spill across the stars. Crisp, clear skies make Narvik a prime destination for northern lights viewing, and the natural setting of spiky mountains and soaring fjords generates a truly glorious spectacle amid incredible staging. Gondolas sway up to the slopes of Narvikfjellet ski resort, which can tempt with fantastic skiing, but also provides a prime spot for views of the lights flashing above. Look out over the vast panorama of the town curving along the fjord's banks, the Fagernesfjellet mountain, and - hopefully - the emerald spread of the natural light display. Polar Park Arctic Wildlife Centre grants Norway’s wildest animals - including wolves, bears and lynx - with a protected haven. Elsewhere, a vast railway, which once transported iron ore to the Swedish border, now provides a dramatic rumble through the best of Norway’s mountain scenery and is one of the country’s most mesmerising rail journeys. Narvik was heavily affected by the Second World War, and the city's museum explains north Norway's strategic importance and explores the German occupation here, as well as the decisive battle for the city's liberation.

Honningsvag (North Cape), Norway

Stand at the top of the world, on the remote and beautiful northern frontier of Europe. Watch as the sun dips gently, before seemingly changing its mind and hovering, sticking around to cast a glorious nocturnal golden light across cliffs that drop to churning waves. There's an ethereal, other-worldly atmosphere in mainland Europe's most northerly location - feel it in the troll folklore that swirls, and the barren tundra landscapes that unravel. In winter, the Northern Cape bathes in seemingly eternal darkness, while summer's months bring the Midnight Sun's ceaseless light. Set so far to the north that trees are unable to grow here, the visitor centre tells this remote, barren landscape's tales, and of its World War involvements. Nearby, encounter Norway's Sami indigenous people - learning of the methods they use to herd reindeer, before visiting authentic fishing villages - where locals have hauled spindly king crabs from the icy waters for generations. Head to the tip of Magerøya Island, for the obligatory photo with the skeletal globe sculpture, which stands looking out over the waters that stretch up towards the Arctic. It marks Europe's northernmost point, a full 71 degrees to the north. There are few more majestic places to witness the Northern Lights dancing across the sky than here, should you be so lucky. Back in your jumping-off point, Honningsvåg, indulge in a well-earned drink to toast your cape adventures or explore further afield with a visit to the millions of puffins that occupy the Gjesværstappan cliff.summer days. The village serves as the gateway to Arctic exploration and the beautiful Nordkapp Plateau, a destination that calls to all visitors of this region. Most of those who journey to Nordkapp (North Cape), the northernmost tip of Europe, are in it for a taste of this unique, otherworldly, rugged yet delicate landscape. You'll see an incredible treeless tundra, with crumbling mountains and sparse dwarf plants. The subarctic environment is very vulnerable, so don't disturb the plants. Walk only on marked trails and don't remove stones, leave car marks, or make campfires. Because the roads are closed in winter, the only access is from the tiny fishing village of Skarsvåg via Sno-Cat, a thump-and-bump ride that's as unforgettable as the desolate view.

Cruising Along North Cape

Situated at the very north tip of Norway and inside the Arctic Circle, there is something very special about being (almost) at the top of the world. Called the northernmost point of Europe, the North Cape (Nordkapp in Norwegian) lies about 1,306.3 mi from the North Pole, with no dry land between except for the Svalbald archipelago. Home to where the Atlantic and Arctic oceans meet, this is the true land of the midnight sun – constant spectacular scenic views and 24-hour sunlight lends itself to a sense of giddy informality aboard. Just imagine sipping a chilled glass of champagne at the very top of the world in full daylight at midnight – sensational. Be sure to be on the lookout for hundreds of thousands of puffins, gannets, cormorants, seals, dolphins and whales that make this stretch of chilly water their home. Not forgetting the colourful, compact fishing villages, so at odds with the otherwise this stark, barren landscape.

Alta, Norway

Think glorious white nights, expansive Scandinavian landscape and an extraordinary sense of adventure and you have Alta. This pretty town 375 kilometres north of the Arctic Circle is everything you expect from Norway. Despite Alta being located in Finnmark, Norway’s most northern region, the summer climate is very mild. This is largely thanks to its location on the inner part of the Alta fjord and the Gulf Stream. The fjord itself stretches for 38 kilometres in total and splits into two before pouring into the Norwegian Sea. Alta is truly the epitome of Norway – forests, mountains and traditional red wooden huts to one side, fjords, coastal landscapes and abundant marine life to the other. However, there is more to Alta than just meets the eye. The village is home to some 6,000 plus year old rock carvings. These exceptional examples of rock art prove the existence of humans in the far north in the prehistoric era. The carvings are so important that they were granted in 1985, and remain the only prehistoric monument in the whole of Norway. Other sights in the village are the striking Northern Lights Cathedral, and the Alta Museum (and why not enjoy a deliciously fresh crab salad in the café while you are there, as the view is one of the most spectacular you are ever likely to see). The indigenous Sami people still thrive in the region, and a chance to spend the day trying traditional food and activities such as dog sledging will be a blessing those who like to immerse themselves in local cultures.

Tromsø, Norway

Feel your heart flutter, as you catch your first glimpse of that famous emerald haze dancing across the stars, during your visit to this wonderful Arctic gateway. Located in the far north of Norway, a visit to Tromso beckons you to the extremes of this magical country, to explore a fairytale land of jagged mountains, glistening glaciers and husky-pulled sledges. Despite its remote location, you'll discover a perhaps surprisingly cosmopolitan city, with a healthy student population injecting plenty of energy. Sat 250 miles above the Arctic Circle - at 69° north - you can bathe in the midnight sun's glow during summer, before winter brings the thick blackness and starry skies of endless polar nights. The darkness doesn't stop the fun - with a polar night half-marathon taking place in January - but the return of the sun is always a reason for a celebration here. To get the best view over the city, take the cable car to Storsteinen's amazing viewpoint. Magnificent views down over the city, fjord and Tromso's arching bridge will unravel before you. Learn more about northerly traditions, polar expeditions and arctic hunting at the Polar Museum. The Science Centre, meanwhile, explains how humans have harnessed and survived these epic landscapes over the years, and explores Tromso's breathtaking natural spectacle - the northern lights. The city is famed for its extraordinary viewing opportunities, which are often said to be the best in the world. The Alpine Botanic Garden is the most northern such garden on the planet, showcasing some of Norway's hardiest plantlife, which survives and thrives at this nose-bleeding altitude.

Oslo, Norway

Norway's capital is a beautiful, stirring city - where old and new blends with thoughtful harmony. You'll find maritime history mixing with trendy art galleries and cafes, while modernist architecture meets traditional palaces and historic sites. Unafraid to reinvent and evolve, visit a former prison that's now a stylish gathering of galleries, or the grubby docklands that is now an urban-cool hangout spot. Ever-expanding, but with a green and progressive outlook, Oslo is urban planning done right. An outdoor city, where the sun shines until late in the summer, locals swarm to its green spaces - or the surrounding countryside to embark on natural adventures amid the sprawling mountains and lakes. Oslo City Hall pays tribute to the pioneers of peace and humanity, with the Nobel Peace Prize awarded here each year, and the winners honoured within. The beautiful Royal Palace caps the central Slottsplassen square and sparkles amid splashing fountains and peaceful gardens. The city's contemporary buildings also gleam in summer's sunshine, with the waterside Opera House boasting a particularly evocative, forward-thinking design. Its sleek white roof slopes gently upwards from ground level, inviting visitors to rise above and admire views of the island-sprinkled harbour. Oslofjord’s islands are stacked with more museums, celebrating everything from simple folk arts to adventurous seafaring traditions. See a mighty wooden Viking ship in full, with 800 years worth of history etched into its wooden boughs.

Pre-And-Post Trip Information

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