"The goal of a CME AWAY® conference by Sea Courses is to provide the very best opportunity for health care professionals to not only LEARN but to CONNECT with peers in a stimulating yet RELAXING environment."
Ocean Cruises

High Canadian Arctic – August 6-20, 2024

On Board Silver Endeavour

Topics: Gender & HealthNeurologyPaediatrics

Departing August 6th, 2024 - August 20th, 2024

Join the Arctic adventurers of the past, exploring the uncharted realm of the magnificent north – on an expedition of fantastic fjords, fierce wildlife and fractured lands. Sail in ultra-luxury to the legendary Northwest Passage’s captivating islands – home to Inuit hamlets and precious Arctic wildlife. Uncover humbling beauty as you sail a web of fjords and spectacular sounds, flanked by sheer cliffs and massive ice fields. There’s still time to crunch through the ice towards Greenland’s natural glory.

Inquire About This Conference
Need Flights?

Faculty & Conference Details

Dr. Kathryn Giles

Dr. Kathryn Giles

Specialty:

Neurology

About The Speaker

Dr. Kathryn Giles completed her medical school and neurology residency at the University of Toronto and moved straight to Cambridge Ontario. She has been a solo community neurologist, seeing both adult and pediatric patients for over 29 years. In addition to a busy full time clinical practice, she does clinical research in the area of multiple sclerosis and has authored numerous scientific posters presented at international MS and neurology meetings. She has sat as a volunteer on the Ontario board of the MS Society of Canada, completing a 6 year tenure. She is an active member of the International Women’s Forum, a global organization with a mandate to promote and support women in leadership around the globe. She is a passionate educator, and although not formally associated with a teaching university position, is an active teacher to medical trainees and practicing physicians. She has spoken internationally, and has toured Asia and Sweden in the area of MS. Her strength is her practical approach to neurological disease. Dr. Giles has been a faculty member at Sea Courses for 7 years and joined the medical advisory board 4 years ago. She helps guide Sea Courses in appropriate educational content to meet the needs of specialists, who comprise approximately half of Sea Courses attendees. Dr. Giles is an enthusiastic traveler and an enthusiastic lecturer, and hopes you will join her soon on a CME AWAY® adventure!

Dr. Anne Niec

Dr. Anne Niec

Specialty:

Pediatrics

About The Speaker

Dr. Niec is faculty at McMaster University and a clinician with their child maltreatment team where her clinical interests lie in assessing the impact of maltreatment and provision of trauma and violence informed care (TVIC). Additionally she has been a lead in Professionalism with the Faculty of Health Science (FHS) addressing “climate” and aspects of harassment and discrimination. She has been a coach for such issues and additionally a mediator. She directs a gender and health initiative for the FHS. Areas of education and coaching around TVIC, professionalism and all it involves, the complexity of child maltreatment from parenting to harm, and coaching have been her focus over the last few years. Recognition of the importance of relationships, the active listening and poignant conversations needed to maintain respective and engaged relationships for one self and others has been a key component of her work. She is humbled to share her lessons learned and engage in further conversations from these experiences during our time together.

CME Topics

CME AWAY® is pleased to invite you on a 14-Night High Canadian Arctic CME Cruise on the Silversea Silver Endeavour from August 6-20, 2024. There are 2 presenters - Dr. Kathryn Giles, a Neurologist from Ontario and Dr. Anne Niec, a Paediatrician, also from Ontario. They have developed a program that will appeal to both family physicians and specialists.  heir programs are designed to be evidence based with interactivity and attendee participation strongly encouraged. Dr. Giles will speak on Neurology topics such as the Neurologic History and Approaches to Upper and Lower Limb Neurologic Complaints. Dr. Niec will present on Parenting, Family Violence, and Crucial Conversations in Relationship Management. Dr. Giles and Dr. Niec look forward to seeing you in the High Canadian Arctic.

Dr. Anne Niec

  • Parenting
  • Leading ourselves and others
  • Professionalism
  • TVIC
  • Self-compassion
  • Crucial conversations
  • Family Violence

Dr. Kathryn Giles

  • Practical Approach to the Neurologic History and Examination
  • Pain in the Neck: A Neurologic Perspective
  • Pain in the Back: A Neurologic Perspective
  • The Upper Limb: A Neurologic Perspective
  • The Lower Limb: A Neurologic Perspective
  • Update on Neuropathy

This course is designed for family physicians, specialists, and allied health care professionals. The aim is to provide evidence-based material, as well as practical and relevant clinical pearls that will be easy to implement into one’s own medical practice. Conference attendees will be invited to complete a pre-course Needs Assessment to assist the faculty with the development of their presentations.

Conference Tuition Price
FP $1395
Specialist $1395
Resident, Retired, NP, RN, PA, Other $1195
Conference Tuition Book Before October 10th, 2023 Book After October 10th, 2023
FP $1245 $1395
Specialist $1245 $1395
Resident, Retired, NP, RN, PA, Other $1045 $1195

High Canadian Arctic – August 6-20, 2024

On Board Silver Endeavour

Sailing August 6th, 2024 - August 20th, 2024

Trip Characteristics

Save This Trip for Later

Want to review this itinerary another time? Just enter your email address below and we'll email a copy of this trip's details to you!

  • Faculty & CME Details
  • Venue Information
  • Itinerary & Schedule
  • Pre-And-Post Trip Information
  • Need Air?

Faculty & CME Details

Dr. Anne Niec

Dr. Anne Niec

Specialty:

Pediatrics

About The Speaker

Dr. Niec is faculty at McMaster University and a clinician with their child maltreatment team where her clinical interests lie in assessing the impact of maltreatment and provision of trauma and violence informed care (TVIC). Additionally she has been a lead in Professionalism with the Faculty of Health Science (FHS) addressing “climate” and aspects of harassment and discrimination. She has been a coach for such issues and additionally a mediator. She directs a gender and health initiative for the FHS. Areas of education and coaching around TVIC, professionalism and all it involves, the complexity of child maltreatment from parenting to harm, and coaching have been her focus over the last few years. Recognition of the importance of relationships, the active listening and poignant conversations needed to maintain respective and engaged relationships for one self and others has been a key component of her work. She is humbled to share her lessons learned and engage in further conversations from these experiences during our time together.

Dr. Kathryn Giles

Dr. Kathryn Giles

Specialty:

Neurology

About The Speaker

Dr. Kathryn Giles completed her medical school and neurology residency at the University of Toronto and moved straight to Cambridge Ontario. She has been a solo community neurologist, seeing both adult and pediatric patients for over 29 years. In addition to a busy full time clinical practice, she does clinical research in the area of multiple sclerosis and has authored numerous scientific posters presented at international MS and neurology meetings. She has sat as a volunteer on the Ontario board of the MS Society of Canada, completing a 6 year tenure. She is an active member of the International Women’s Forum, a global organization with a mandate to promote and support women in leadership around the globe. She is a passionate educator, and although not formally associated with a teaching university position, is an active teacher to medical trainees and practicing physicians. She has spoken internationally, and has toured Asia and Sweden in the area of MS. Her strength is her practical approach to neurological disease. Dr. Giles has been a faculty member at Sea Courses for 7 years and joined the medical advisory board 4 years ago. She helps guide Sea Courses in appropriate educational content to meet the needs of specialists, who comprise approximately half of Sea Courses attendees. Dr. Giles is an enthusiastic traveler and an enthusiastic lecturer, and hopes you will join her soon on a CME AWAY® adventure!

This course is designed for family physicians, specialists, and allied health care professionals. The aim is to provide evidence-based material, as well as practical and relevant clinical pearls that will be easy to implement into one’s own medical practice. Conference attendees will be invited to complete a pre-course Needs Assessment to assist the faculty with the development of their presentations.

Conference Tuition
Conference Tuition Book Before October 10th, 2023 Book After October 10th, 2023
FP $1045 $1195
Specialist $1045 $1195
Resident, Retired, NP, RN, PA, Other $845 $995

Venue Information

Join the Arctic adventurers of the past, exploring the uncharted realm of the magnificent north – on an expedition of fantastic fjords, fierce wildlife and fractured lands. Sail in ultra-luxury to the legendary Northwest Passage’s captivating islands – home to Inuit hamlets and precious Arctic wildlife. Uncover humbling beauty as you sail a web of fjords and spectacular sounds, flanked by sheer cliffs and massive ice fields. There’s still time to crunch through the ice towards Greenland’s natural glory.

Additional Noteworthy Features

Sailing to both poles, our newest ship redefines the meaning of ultra-luxury expedition cruising. Her PC6 ice-class rating is one of the highest in the industry, while her state-of-the-art equipment and exploration technology offer one of the most advanced expedition experiences ever. Silver Endeavour introduces a new era in ultra-luxury expedition cruising, and brings the remote and remarkable to you in hallmark Silversea comfort. Join us for endless possibilities both onboard and on land aboard Silver Endeavour, the most luxurious expedition ship at sea.

Itinerary & Schedule

Date Port / Location Arrival Time Departure Time Notes / Details
August 6th Montreal, Quebec
August 7th Charter Flight to Iqaluit, Nunavut
August 8th Charter Flight to Pond Inlet, Nunavut 8:00pm
August 9th Cape Hay, Bylot Island 6:30am 1:00pm 2:00pm-5:30pm
August 10th Beechey Island 6:00am 4:00pm
August 11th Creswell Bay 8:00am 7:00pm
August 12th Prince Leopold Island 7:30am 6:00pm
August 13th Devon Island (Radstock Bay) 6:30am 6:00pm
August 14th Croker Bay 6:30am 11:30am
Dundas Harbour, Devon Island 1:30pm 7:00pm
August 15th Grise Fjord, Ellesmere Island 10:30am 4:30pm 7:00am-10:00am
August 16th Qaanaaq (Thule), Greenland 12:00pm 6:00pm 7:00am-11:00am
August 17th Cape York, Greenland 6:00am 12:00pm 1:00pm-5:30pm
August 18th Pond Inlet, Nunavut / Charter flight to Iqaluit 7:00am
August 19th Iqaluit Charter Flight to Montreal
August 20th Montreal, Quebec

Detailed Port Descriptions

Day 1        Montreal, Quebec

Fly to Montreal. Silversea offers a pre-cruise hotel night prior to the charter flight to Iqaluit, depending on Silversea's air programme flight schedule. In the case that your flight is the same day, Silversea will offer a hotel day-use. Hotels are either located in the city centre or at an airport property to accommodate guests on very early/late flight schedules. Hotel: Fairmont Queen Elizabeth (or similar)

Day 2         Charter Flight to Iqaluit, Nunavut

In order to streamline the embarkation procedure, Silversea will provide charter or group space flights between Montreal-Iqaluit. Silversea offers a pre-cruise hotel night/s prior to embarking. You will transfer to hotel for overnight stay. Hotel: Aqsarniit Hotel & Conference Center (or similar)

Day 3          Iqaluit, Nunavut to Pond Inlet, Nunavut

In order to streamline the embarkation procedure, Silversea will provide charter to Pond Inlet.  Today you will embark Silversea Silver Endeavour. Located in northern Baffin Island Pond Inlet is a small predominantly Inuit community with a population of roughly 1 ,500 inhabitants. In 1818 the British explorer John Ross named a bay in the vicinity after the English astronomer John Pond. Today Pond Inlet is considered one of Canada's "jewels of the North" thanks to several picturesque glaciers and mountain ranges nearby. Many archaeological sites of ancient Dorset and Thule peoples can be found near Pond Inlet. The Inuit hunted caribou, ringed and harp seals, fish, polar bears, and walrus, as well as narwhals, geese, ptarmigans and Arctic hares long before European and American whalers came here to harvest bowhead whales. Pond Inlet is also known as a major center of Inuit art especially the printmaking and stone carving.

Day 4      Cape Hay, Bylot Island

Day 5       Beechey Island

Beechey Island is a small island off the southwest coast of Devon Island, separated by a narrow waterway called the Barrow Strait. Captain William Edward Parry was the first European to visit the island in 1819. His lieutenant, Frederick William Beechey, named the island after his father, the artist William Beechey (1753–1839). Beechey Island played a significant role in the history of Arctic Exploration. During the winter of 1845-46, Sir John Franklin and his men camped on the island as part of their ill-fated quest to find the Northwest Passage. Mummified remains of three of Franklin’s crew were discovered, giving a better understanding of what happened before the disappearance of the expedition. In 1850 Edward Belcher used the island as a base while surveying the area. Later, in 1903, Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen stopped at the island at the beginning of his successful voyage in search for the Northwest Passage. Subsequently, Beechey Island has been declared a "Territorial Historic Site" by the Northwest Territories government in 1975 and a National Historic Site of Canada in 1993. It now is part of Nunavut.

Day 6       Creswell Bay

Day 7        Prince Leopold Island

Day 8       Devon Island (Radstock Bay)

Devon Island is Canada’s sixth largest island and was first seen by Europeans in the early 17th century. The Thule culture had already settled there many centuries before, and left behind qarmat homes, made of rocks, whale bones, rock and sod walls, and skins for roofs that tell a story of over 800 years of human habitation. Other striking finds in this area are the many fossils of corals, crinoids and nautiloids that can be seen. Just across Lancaster Sound is Prince Leopold Island, a Canadian Important Bird Area, a federally listed migratory bird sanctuary, and a Key Migratory Bird Terrestrial Habitat site with large numbers of Thick-billed Murres, Northern Fulmars and Black-legged Kittiwakes that breed there.

Day 9         Croker Bay

Croker Bay is a vast cerulean deep-water bay nestled on the southern coast of Devon Island which is in the Qikiqtaaluk Region of Nunavut, Canada. This 40km (24 miles) long Arctic waterway boasts rugged rock terraced mountains which sit atop two beautiful blue ice tidewater glaciers. Devon Island is Earth’s largest uninhabited island and is a breath-taking 55,247 km2 (21,331 square miles) patchwork of Precambrian gneiss, Paleozoic siltstones and shales. Known locally as “Mars on Earth” the dazzling otherworldly landscape offers spectacular views. The snow-topped ancient stone is dappled with rich hues of terracotta, red and blue. Devon Island is one of many islands that make up the picturesque Canadian Artic Archipelago and has a scattering of mountain ranges including the Treuter Mountains, Haddington Range and the Cunningham Mountains. Croker Bay was named in 1819 by the explorer William Edward Parry in honour of John Wilson Croker, a parliamentarian and Secretary to the Admiralty.

Day 9         Dundas Harbour, Devon Island

Austere, remote and a rather severe, Devon Island is as close the closest thing to Mars on planet Earth. The rocky terrain, dry, cold climate and 14-mile wide crater on the north of the island have made it home for a team of research scientists from NASA, who live in the small research station during the Arctic summer. Other than these few men and women, Devon Island is completely unpeopled, and the largest uninhabited island in the world. There was human habitation as recently as 1951, when a Canadian Mounted Police post that had been on the island since 1924 to monitor illegal activities such as whaling closed. At 320 miles long and 80–100 miles wide, it is the largest of the Parry Islands. Dundas Harbour is found in the south of the island. Then island is set in the icy Arctic Ocean, south of Ellesmere Island and west of Baffin Bay. This make it Canada’s sixth largest island. Discovered by English explorer William Baffin in 1616, the island did not make it on to any maps until William Edward Parry’s exploration of the Arctic in 1820. Despite the desolate conditions, the island does show signs of having sustained human life as many as 3,000 years ago, with the remains of a Thule settlement dating back to 1000 A.D., including tent rings, middens and a gravesite providing testament to the fact. The island is named Talluruti in local Inuktitut language, literally translating as “a woman’s chin with tattoos on it”, as from a distance the deep crevasses resemble traditional facial tattoos.

Day 10       Grise Fjord, Ellesmere Island

Nestled on the southern tip of Canada’s Ellesmere Island Grise Fjord is a remote and isolated wonderful wilderness. Located at the top of the world at 1,160 kilometers (721 miles) north of the Artic Circle you’ll gaze in wonder at the frozen beauty as you enter the fjord. The stunning ice-blue waters of the fjord are tucked between two towering snow-dusted cliffs. The land never thaws out even when the sun shines twenty-four hours a day from April through to August. Indeed, the fjord’s name in Inuktittuq means “the place that never thaws”. In 1899, Norwegian explorer Otto Sverdrup named the place “pig fjord” because the sounds of the local walrus called to mind a chorus of grunting pigs. Grise is the Norwegian word for pig. Today you’ll find a profusion of local wildlife: Ringed seal, Bearded seal and Harp seal, walruses, Narwhal and Beluga Whales can all be seen in the sea. The skies are home to Ravens, Ivory gulls, Jaegers, Geese, Gyrfalcons, Kittiwakes and Northern Fulmars. Polar bears and Muskoxen also roam the land of this northern wilderness. In 1953 the hamlet was formed at Grise Fjord by the Canadian government. They relocated Inuit families from Inukjuak, Quebec. This is the most northerly public community in Canada and is comprised of no more than 150 residents. This is one of the most cold inhabited places on the planet with an average temperature of a chilly -16.5 degrees centigrade.

Day 11        Qaanaaq (Thule), Greenland

Located on the Hayes Peninsula and bathed by Inglefield Fjord, Qaanaaq – formerly named Utlima Thule, is a charming Greenlandic town. Known as the northernmost town in Greenland, Qaanaaq offers many incredible experiences very specific to the Arctic. The famous Midnight Sun for instance, a period during which the sun never sets. Hard to picture but extraordinary to witness, this phenomenon is visible between late-April and late-August. Land of extremes, Greenland welcomed various immigrating peoples, ready to face the Arctic challenging living conditions. Among these, the Inuit left their mark in Qaanaaq. Their hunting traditions with kayaks and dog sleds are still present and necessary to survival, given Qaanaaq’s isolation. Visit the town’s museum to discover more about the area’s history and the Inuit culture. The Qaanaq museum can be found in a white house in the middle of the town’s colourful houses. The latter used to be the home of famous Arctic explorer Knud Rasmussen who set off seven expeditions from Qaanaaq’s area. The museum contains an exhibition about him and other explorers, but also historical items like “tupilaqs”, avenging monsters made with various objects like animal bones, which have great importance in the Greenlandic Inuit religion. Off the town’s shores and in the shade of massive icebergs, the cold waters home thousands of narwhals. These toothed whales also nicknamed the “unicorns of the sea” love coming to Qaanaaq to breed during summer, giving you a chance to spot some of them during this period.

Day 12       Cape York, Greenland

Visit the arctic seascape of Cape York, Greenland. Located on the northwestern coast of Greenland in Baffin Bay, Cape York is an important geographical feature delimiting the Melville Bay at its northwestern end and Kiatassuaq Island at its other end. There is a chain of coastal islands that stretches between the two capes, most notably Meteorite Island, named for the discovery one of the world’s largest iron meteorites in Savissivik, a settlement on the island. The iron from this meteorite attracted Inuit migrating from Arctic Canada who used the metal in making tools and harpoons. Visitors to this region will see iconic drifting blue-white icebergs that are shrinking as the earth temperature rises.

Day 13       Pond Inlet, Nunavut

Today your expedition comes to an end with a new found respect and love of what the Arctic has to offer. You will disembark Silversea Silver Endeavour. In order to streamline the disembarkation procedure, Silversea will provide charter flights to Iqaluit. You will transfer to hotel for overnight stay. Hotel: Aqsarniit Hotel & Conference Center (or similar)

Day 14       Iqaluit, Nunavut to Montreal

Today you will board the charter flights or group space flights to Montreal to connect to your flight home.   Silversea will offer a post-cruise hotel night/s prior to returning home, as indicated on your booking invoice, depending on Silversea's air programme flight schedule. In the case that your flight is the same day, we will offer a hotel day-use. Most of our hotels are centrally located in the city centre, however, we also partner with several airport properties to accommodate guests on very early/late flight schedules. Hotel: Fairmont Queen Elizabeth (or similar)

Day 15      Montreal, Quebec

If you have stayed at the post-cruise hotel in Montreal, today you will fly home well rested and ready to share tales of your Arctic Adventure.          

Pre-And-Post Trip Information

There are no pre or post tours created for this itinerary. To build your own, or simply add hotel nights talk to your Advisor.
x
x

cruises@seacourses.com











    YesNo




    YesNo

    x